Sacraments

The UMC recognizes two sacraments: Holy Baptism and Holy Communion. Other rites such as Confirmation, Ordination, Holy Matrimony, Funerals, and Anointing of the Sick are performed but are not considered sacraments.

Baptism

Baptism

Methodist Beliefs on Baptism:

Participants learn about the Methodist understanding of Baptism and the response required after Baptism. Discussion then revolves around the vows the parents make and how they can effectively keep those vows to nurture their children in the faith.

We believe the Sacraments, ordained by Christ, are symbols and pledges of the Christian’s profession and of God’s love toward us. They are means of grace by which God works invisibly in us, quickening, strengthening and confirming our faith in Him. Two Sacraments are ordained by Christ our Lord, namely Baptism and the Lord’s Supper.

We believe Baptism signifies entrance into the household of faith, and is a symbol of repentance and inner cleansing from sin, a representation of new birth in Christ Jesus and a mark of Christian discipleship.

We believe children are under the atonement of Christ and as heirs of the Kingdom of God are acceptable subjects for Christian Baptism. Children of believing parents through Baptism become the special responsibility of the Church. They should be nurtured and led to personal acceptance of Christ, and by profession of faith confirm their Baptism.

Communion

Communion

Communion is a shared meal of bread and juice in which we experience the presence and love of God. Here’s some helpful info about Communion at Chapel Roswell and Roswell UMC.

Sacrament

Communion is a sacrament; an outward, participatory sign of God’s grace at work within us. In the United Methodist Church, we recognize two sacraments: baptism and communion. In Communion, we remember and participate in Christ’s final meal with the disciples. We thank God for the grace extended to us through Christ. You may have heard this meal called Holy Communion, Lord’s Supper, or Eucharist.

Invitation

As United Methodists, we share in an open table. This means there are no restrictions on who can participate. You don’t have to be a member of this church or any church. You also don’t have to be a certain age, so bring your child and bring your grandma. Everyone is welcome because Christ invites us all to eat with him and meets us all here.

Elements

The meal is simple: bread and juice. The bread and juice represent the body and blood of Christ, broken and shed on the cross. These two simple elements of bread and juice embody the sacrifice Christ made on the cross along with the love and forgiveness that are extended to us through that act.

Coming to the Table

Many people extend their hands one over the other with palms facing up to serve as a reminder that the meal is a gift from God which we receive freely. You will be handed a piece of bread broken from the larger loaf of bread. This reminds us that although there are many of us, we are united together in God. Then dip the bread into the juice and eat.

THROUGH THIS MEAL TOGETHER, GOD FEEDS US, SUSTAINS US, AND EMPOWERS US TO LIVE AS CHRISTIANS IN THE WORLD. COME, LET US SHARE TOGETHER.

  1. The Table: Invited to the Table November 19, 2017 // Rev. Eric Lee